UK Reefs

General Interest => DIY => Topic started by: braecottage on January 18, 2013, 12:43:17 AM

Title: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on January 18, 2013, 12:43:17 AM
Well......  I've been lurking here long enough so here is my first post. 

First of all a huge thank you to Jamie for all of the work he has put into the Jarduino code and for making it available to us all.

I have had great fun getting my project to the stage it's at now and I'm sure all of you fellow Jarduino'ers will agree that your project can become rather time consuming!!!!  Researching and locating parts.....trawling ebay........waiting for the postie.......bumping off work early to do some more soldering......kidding yourself you can do it cheaply.....anyway.....  here's what I've got.

The box with the arduino, PSU, alarm, DCĖDC converters, Relays, drivers and fuses is finished.  I wanted to make mine modular, so that if I ever change my 90litre nano tank all I need to do is change the hood i.e. the LEDs and fans.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on January 18, 2013, 12:46:38 AM
Some more photos:
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: tangtastic on January 18, 2013, 03:38:28 AM
Great build, how do you find the fan noise from the psu, i modded mine with a simple temp sensor running the cooling fans, thought it was better off been on around 25% and ramp up with the heat then on 100% only when hot lol
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: isacco on January 19, 2013, 10:50:31 AM
Great work, nice and clean. You are right about time consuming , but I think is all the expectation that hook us when we build it. And we all know is no good to do the math, 5 bucks here, few more there, but no good to sum all. It's the fun and pride to build it, my wife calls it "big boys toy" :)
 How many LEDs / channel do you use with ledsee driver.? I need to drive 8/channel for my next build but didn't have time to test it yet.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on January 19, 2013, 12:02:45 PM

 How many LEDs / channel do you use with ledsee driver.? I need to drive 8/channel for my next build but didn't have time to test it yet.

Total number of LEDs:

14 x White
14 x Royal Blue
3 x 1 watt Blue for Moonlights
3 x UV (Mainly for an experiment)
I bought red but decided against fitting after reading about algae growth.

I'm going to double up the PWM for both Royal Blue and Whites running 7 x Cree Xp-g per channel running through a 1 ohm ballast resistor and an 800mA fuse on the ledsee.  This leaves 2 channels unused, my PSU is set to 25.2 volts.

The smaller drivers are for the 2 strings of Blue and UV.  These are run through a dc-dc dropper to be fed with a voltage of 10.2 volts.

Great build, how do you find the fan noise from the psu, i modded mine with a simple temp sensor running the cooling fans, thought it was better off been on around 25% and ramp up with the heat then on 100% only when hot lol

Fan noise not too bad from PSU.  If it starts to annoy me I'm going to change the fan inside the PSU for a PWM controlled one and use the unused sump temp probe to control it.

Kevin
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on January 19, 2013, 06:03:12 PM
A+
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: bigguy on January 19, 2013, 07:08:27 PM
Spot On Dude Were Did you Source The Parts IE LEds and Any Pics of that :)
looks a Great unit and a good Plan on the Modula thats worth Considering
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: tangtastic on January 19, 2013, 11:16:09 PM
Your dc-dc converters do they go direct to the leds or via led driver ?
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on January 20, 2013, 12:05:19 AM
Spot On Dude Were Did you Source The Parts IE LEds and Any Pics of that :)
looks a Great unit and a good Plan on the Modula thats worth Considering
Nearly all parts came from various ebay vendors with the LEDs coming from an contact in Hong Kong.  Pics of hood and LEDs to follow once complete!
Your dc-dc converters do they go direct to the leds or via led driver ?
Via a driver otherwise there would be no current regulation.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: bigguy on January 20, 2013, 12:22:55 AM
Thanks look forward to it dude
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: tangtastic on January 21, 2013, 09:06:24 AM
Thats what i was thinking you did, dont need the dc-dc converters as long as the leds max amperage doesn't exceed the voltage will fall in line, i have 35v going in to the sure electronic drivers, the 3w one is rated around 800ma got 4 x 3w red leds on it rated at 850ma and around 2.2-2.5v each so max voltage will be 10v at 850ma, as the driver will not let the led go past 800ma its fine, ohms law as the amperage is taken care of as well as the leds fixed resistance then the voltage will just fall in line


Spot On Dude Were Did you Source The Parts IE LEds and Any Pics of that :)
looks a Great unit and a good Plan on the Modula thats worth Considering
Nearly all parts came from various ebay vendors with the LEDs coming from an contact in Hong Kong.  Pics of hood and LEDs to follow once complete!
Your dc-dc converters do they go direct to the leds or via led driver ?
Via a driver otherwise there would be no current regulation.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on January 22, 2013, 10:19:09 PM
Thats what i was thinking you did, dont need the dc-dc converters as long as the leds max amperage doesn't exceed the voltage will fall in line, i have 35v going in to the sure electronic drivers, the 3w one is rated around 800ma got 4 x 3w red leds on it rated at 850ma and around 2.2-2.5v each so max voltage will be 10v at 850ma, as the driver will not let the led go past 800ma its fine, ohms law as the amperage is taken care of as well as the leds fixed resistance then the voltage will just fall in line

Ahh.  I'd read about connecting the smaller strings of LEDs up to the full voltage but wasn't brave enough to do it.  I understand how it works, but it doesn't seem right connecting 3 LEDs in series up to 25 volts - even when they're through the driver.  I had the small drivers and a spare dc-dc dropper "in stock" anyway so nothing lost.  I suppose I have 2 spare channels if I choose to add more LEDs at a later date.

Kevin
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: tangtastic on January 23, 2013, 08:41:52 PM
Dont blame you, got 3 x 5w uv leds £7 each but there around 5v each got them on a 3w driver and 35v in, will check the voltage one day lol
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 03, 2013, 01:04:00 PM
Update.  I think(!) I'm finished.  The LED's have been in use for a week now with everything in the tank enjoying the extra light.  I have halved Jamies stock LED settings as a starting point and may build them up slightly week on week. 

My Zoas and Mushrooms are larger than ever, and a visit to my LFS yesterday added a Trumpet Coral and a small Yellow Torch Coral.  I only have one fish - my 16 year old clown fish.  I've had him since he was a tiddler, he used to stay at my folks in my three foot tank until I got organised enough break that set-up and move him to my place.

My existing tank is a second-hand Betta Lifespace 90 litre.  When I bought it it came with a spare hood - I think the previous owner had had a replacement under warranty for some reason.  Anyway the physical parts of the spare hood were perfect which gave me plenty of time to mod it before doing a straight swap with the fitted stock hood with the two small fluorescents and 3 moonlights.

Only one item is puzzling me just now.  The temp sensors periodically flash error which stops and then starts the fans for a second or two.  All three of the sensors do it and in no specific order.  This is a new fault it didn't do it until I put the hood on the tank!  I've checked all of the connections on my D-sub connectors and they seem to be fine.  It may be salt ingress into the water temp sensor or possibly a bad joint to the probes.  I'll check tonight.

As the heatsink is enclosed using the stock fans on the hood resulted in very high heat sink temps.  I remedied this by buying a 50mm blower fan and making a duct to underneath the heatsink.  I duct taped any small holes around the heatsink base making a complete seal which in turn pressurised the whole back side of the heatsink.  I put a super quiet computer fan on the other side as an exhaust.  The heatsink now stays at around 29 celsius which I think is pretty reasonable - with a cushion for a bit more heat when I ramp up the LEDs.

Pics below:
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: bigguy on February 03, 2013, 01:14:00 PM
nice one braecottage looks very good what LEds did you use and how many of each
You have to be pleased with that looks very good
I have a boyu tl450 plan to use as a frag tank / quarantine once i empty it simlure sort of thing
Looks Good
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on February 03, 2013, 04:24:16 PM
Very nice bud. I hope you get that temp issue solved.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 03, 2013, 07:36:32 PM

Only one item is puzzling me just now.  The temp sensors periodically flash error which stops and then starts the fans for a second or two.  All three of the sensors do it and in no specific order.  This is a new fault it didn't do it until I put the hood on the tank!  I've checked all of the connections on my D-sub connectors and they seem to be fine.  It may be salt ingress into the water temp sensor or possibly a bad joint to the probes.  I'll check tonight.


After some trouble shooting eliminating temp sensors and loose wires, it seems my temp sensor problem is caused by my new 50mm blower fan.  I have disconnected it completely, leaving the 50mm normal style fan connected and the fault stops.  It is the same current rating as the other fan which is .13A and is a genuine 3 wire PWM fan (I know some aren't and although they have 3 wires the yellow and red are joined).  I have even tried just connecting the positive and negative which doesn't help. 

Any ideas much appreciated.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 03, 2013, 07:49:27 PM
Scrap the last post.  It's still doing it with only one fan connected :-(
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on February 03, 2013, 07:59:30 PM
Could be a few things. 1 Arduino power isn't high enough (I recommend 12V and at least 2A or more), 2 Bad connections, 3 wrong valued resistor (make sure you are only using 1 resistor total, no matter how many temp sensors), 4. Bad sensors. You can remove all your sensors except one and see how it behaves, then remove that one and try the next, and so on, then try two together, then three... This will help you narrow down the problem.
Title: That looks so cool
Post by: Nigel Marlow on February 11, 2013, 09:05:08 PM
That looks so good Braecottage, I particularly like the idea of it being modular.  What's that you have used between the Ledsee PCBs and the heatsink?
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 11, 2013, 09:53:18 PM
That looks so good Braecottage, I particularly like the idea of it being modular.  What's that you have used between the Ledsee PCBs and the heatsink?
After some testing I found that they didn't get very hot, so I snipped all of the pins off the bottom and stuck it to my case using double sided tape with a layer of plasticard in-between to make sure I didn't get any short circuits on the back.  I couldn't stack it as it didn't fit into my design that way.  Its easy to site remotely anyway as you only need to connect to a few pins for Jarduino use.

Kevin.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: Nigel Marlow on February 11, 2013, 11:59:22 PM
Ah I see, I'm thinking of just using stand offs to do the same thing and hadn't considered plasticard believing air circulation to be important regards the prospect of heat.
Good luck with getting to the bottom of your current puzzle.
Nigel
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: pughy on February 15, 2013, 01:51:46 PM
Loving the box your hosing it all in, where did you get it, I'm after something similar to put all my equipment in?
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 16, 2013, 11:49:31 AM
Loving the box your hosing it all in, where did you get it, I'm after something similar to put all my equipment in?
One of these:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PLASTIC-BOX-ENCLOSURE-CASE-HOBBY-ELECTRONIC-PROJECT-ABS-E39-/140834788034?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Components_Supplies_ET&hash=item20ca6852c2

It is a bit of a squash if you intend putting all of your components in one of these but it does look neat.  I used an alloy case from a fruit machine PSU and butchered it to make mounting plates to fit inside the box.  You will also need to mount your Meanwell upright - but you can use the threaded holes on it to your advantage.  I only have 4 screws protruding to the outside of the plastic case to keep it tidy.  A bit of engineering required. 

I also considered a mini PC case.  They have nice mountings for fans as standard and have a bit more space.  It depends where you want it to go, I wanted mine to rest upright as I've got limited space.

Kevin
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 16, 2013, 12:03:07 PM

Only one item is puzzling me just now.  The temp sensors periodically flash error which stops and then starts the fans for a second or two.  All three of the sensors do it and in no specific order.  This is a new fault it didn't do it until I put the hood on the tank!  I've checked all of the connections on my D-sub connectors and they seem to be fine.  It may be salt ingress into the water temp sensor or possibly a bad joint to the probes.  I'll check tonight.


The saga continues...

I've replaced all of the temperature sensors to totally eliminate them.  The fault still persists.

I have spotted that one of my fans still spins when the temperature is lower than the start up temp that is set.  I have two different types of fan connected in parallel - obviously the one with the lower start up current is the one that starts.  My wiring to the fans is exactly as pictured on page 20 of the user manual.

So I think the PWM pin 44 is giving a signal when it shouldn't be and think this might be related to my issue.  I've already changed the transistor to eliminate leakage through it which would also cause the fan to start.

I have measured voltage from pin 44 when the fans are supposed to be off (I know I should probably use an oscilloscope here).  I get 5 volts between pin 44 and GND.  I don't think this is normal and think it should be 0 volts.  When the temp sensor goes above the "on" temp the fans work as expected but with the stop start error.

Any ideas?
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on March 15, 2013, 01:20:07 PM
Dallas Temp sensors. 

Just a note for those of you using the readily available "waterproof" DS18B20 temp sensors.  I started developing temp errors and was quickly able to suss it was the water one that was at fault.  After disassembly removal of the stainless cap revealed it was full of water with already some advanced corrosion. 

Some extra marine tank friendly sealant, or glue around the stainless cap may be a wise addition before submerging your probe!  Perhaps another layer of heatshrink with the adhesive inside may be enough. 

Maybe worth  a look at yours - especially if you're relying on the probe to control your heater/chiller.

Kev
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on March 15, 2013, 07:36:13 PM
OUCH!  Thanks for alerting everyone to this.  I suspected these particular probes I saw available on eBay (and a number of you guys using) would eventually lead to failure.  I recall discussing the potential hazards with these probes a while back with some of you guys.  If you are noticing corrosion, I'm sure you can guess where the disintegrating metal is going.  Yep, right into your fish tank.  I don't know if there are any adverse effects on your tank with this kind of metal (SS), but I know some metals (ie - copper) can wipe out your livestock.  So I'm sure it's worth looking into.  To prevent leaks/corrosion, I think it's sound advice to completely seal these SS probes in Aquarium grade silicon. 

If you are looking for an alternative waterproofing solution, below is what I did with my temp sensors: 
Quote from: Me in my 44 Gallon Pentagon DIY Build Thread
While on the subject of temperature sensors, this is how I made the water temperature sensor waterproof:
(https://graph.facebook.com/676170662396868/picture)

All I did was take a tiny light bulb, removed the screw contact and filament and the rest of the guts, leaving behind just the glass enclosure. Then I soldered the DS18B20 sensor to an old telephone cable (which had 4 insulated wires twisted together inside, of which I used 3. The fact that the wires are twisted is good, as this has an electronic noise cancelling effect). Next I slathered on some liquid electrical tape to the exposed legs and wires to prevent unintentional contact. After it dried, I tested it for functionality. After passing the tests, I then dumped some thermal paste in the glass bulb (the white stuff in the picture on the right). Next, I inserted the DS18B20 cable assembly until it bottomed out and completely covered the sensor. Finally, I filled up the remaining space in the bulb with Aquarium Grade Silicone and let it dry for a day or so. Thereís little to no air inside, and this is a good thing as air is an insulator. Further, since the thermal paste is a heat conductor, it will allow for more accurate readings much faster. Itís completely watertight and its performance is spot on...
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: WmTasker on March 15, 2013, 07:45:39 PM
Very nice build and I love how clean your unit looks.  Where did you get your 9pin and 15 pin HD connectors to mount on your box?  How easy was the soldering?  What size wire did you use? 

Thanks.

Billy
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on March 16, 2013, 11:08:51 PM
Very nice build and I love how clean your unit looks.  Where did you get your 9pin and 15 pin HD connectors to mount on your box?  How easy was the soldering?  What size wire did you use? 

The connectors are D-SUB type, which are readily available, but soldering can be tight if you're not used to it.  I used 1 amp alarm wire for the leads.

I think you're going to have to learn to solder if you're taking on this project.  Why not buy a couple of small kits from Maplin to practice on?  It will save you time and frustration in the long run.

Something silly like this:
http://www.maplin.co.uk/metronome-22554
or this:
http://www.maplin.co.uk/flashing-led-sweetheart-22543

You'll learn a lot - and any mistakes are unlikely to be costly.  Even if you go down the route of screw shields you are going to have to solder certain parts of your project.  Jamies manual for the Jarduino is excellent and if each step is followed through you shouldn't have any problems.

Kev
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on March 30, 2013, 02:59:03 PM
Latest update....

Jarduino has been working well for a couple of months now.  No problems other than the water ingress to the temp sensor which was easily fixed. 

I've had a slight algae bloom over the last couple of weeks so have decreased the duration of the lighting and decided to try some chaeto in one of the rear chambers of my tank - I don't have a sump.

I used a small food box and a tiny heatsink with a couple of LEDs, one warm white and one red.  Hopefully this will make the chaeto grow nicely.  I have used the sump channel on the Jarduino and added another small driver into my box.  I've set the driver to 350mA and the LED's to a max of 50% so don't think a fan is necessary.

Luckily the food box sits perfectly on the lips of the rear chamber and can be easily moved for maintenance.  There is no light bleeding into the tank and the lid shuts perfectly.  I've programmed it to light opposing the main lights - this should also stabilise the PH overnight.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on March 30, 2013, 05:48:55 PM
Your work is simply top notch Kev!  Don't you just love it when things fit perfectly without much planning?  Anyway, as I'm sure you're aware, it's common to have an algae bloom after upgrading to LEDs, as they put out a lot more light.  I hope your Chaeto does the trick in getting rid of it.  In addition to outcompeting for nutrients that algae live on, they provide excellent breeding grounds for a bunch of different micro-fauna (ie copepods, amphipods, etc.) which in turn serve as a mini cleanup crew, getting into spots crabs, snails, etc. simply can't (and therefore further reducing nitrates), plus a lot of fish/corals/anemones love to eat them. Also, as you mentioned, chaeto helps to stabilize pH when run in opposite lighting cycles, so IMO adding chaeto is always a good move.  If you haven't done so already, manually remove the nuisance algae and do a water change.  This will help you gain the initial upper hand in your fight...

Not to belabor the benefits of adding chaeto, but one last thing worth mentioning, assuming your chaeto grows well, when you do your pruning don't just toss it in the trash.  Instead, unload it on eBay.   My extra chaeto is now paying for ALL of the fish food, and every now and again some extra livestock.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on April 03, 2013, 09:55:32 PM
Thanks Jamie - reassuring advice. 

I thought the Chaeto was worth a go.  So far so good the algae seems to have taken a hit.  Hopefully after a couple of weeks settling in I'll know if it's working, and hopefully I'll need to trim the Cheato!
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: bigguy on May 17, 2013, 03:10:33 PM
any updates Kev :)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on May 24, 2013, 12:50:58 PM
Another quick update:

Everything seems to be going well and I'm just enjoying my reef.  There is always the temptation to want something different (bigger!?) but I'm happy with what I've got just now and my 90 litre nano is coming along great.  My Zoas are growing and new heads keep appearing and it also looks like one of my Candy Canes are ready to split.

Algae is under control, I've put the fuge light on to 24hrs and it doesn't seem to have had any ill effects; Chaeto and algae are growing in the back chamber of the tank and not the front now. 

I've also increased the UV up to about 80% in the morning and late at night.  This gives the Zoas and Candy Canes a nice colour "pop" when used with the royal blues.

Any newbies - don't get too hung up on led makes, going for max current or for too many leds- pay more attention to the colours you're using.  The leds are really bright and even with my royal blues and whites both at 50-60% at midday is probably more than enough without encouraging algae or bleaching.

I'm doing 15% water changes once a week and running carbon and rowaphos in filter socks in the rear chamber along with the Chaeto.  Still no skimmer as I don't have room for one.  Haven't tested the water for about a month, but last time I did everything was well within (my) parameters.  I'll maybe test later and post the results.

I've attached a couple of photos, I'm off to my LFS for lunch, they've got a great cafe......  If there is a frogspawn or hammerhead in stock I may just be tempted too!

Kev



Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: bigguy on May 24, 2013, 01:50:49 PM
NIce One dude
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on May 24, 2013, 09:34:04 PM
Very nice Kev.  And good advice on the LEDs.  I know the temptation is to get the latest, but the newer higher current models seem to me to only cost a lot more and not perform all that much better.  And as far as the number go, I'm fairly sure I could have done with quite a few less myself, but at the same time, since I have more than I need, I can run them at lower power and therefore extend their useful lives...
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: tangtastic on June 07, 2013, 08:20:11 AM
Spot on kev nice one fella
 :)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on August 02, 2013, 02:25:21 PM
Slightly off topic but I thought I'd show off the frag rack I made this morning.  Been experimenting with some acrylic lately.  Bought some small sheets and adhesive to play with.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on August 02, 2013, 02:27:02 PM
I know it has to go inside the tank for the corals to grow!!!

8-)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on August 02, 2013, 04:51:54 PM
Nice Kev.  I think frag racks go for around $20 USD or so.  Hopefully you came in well under that price.  I've seen some that use magnets instead of suction cups.  If the magnets are strong (get the kind that won't rust), you don't have to worry about your rack falling down as much as you would with suction cups.  Plus, makes it much easier to move around, etc.  Just a suggestion for Kev's Frag Rack, v2.  And yes, corals do tend to grow much better in the water lol!
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: compfranon on August 02, 2013, 10:14:35 PM
Nice Rack  ::) loved the "inside tank" comment

I used good strong magnets for mine, but sandwiched them between a couple of pieces of acrylic to protect them. As Jamie says, you can move the rack without getting your hands wet.

Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on August 03, 2013, 11:40:36 AM
I used good strong magnets for mine, but sandwiched them between a couple of pieces of acrylic to protect them. As Jamie says, you can move the rack without getting your hands wet.
Think I'll get some rare earth magnets and sandwich them for the mark 2.  The suckers are still holding but I don't have too much faith.  I looked everywhere for coated magnets before I tried the MK1 but to no avail.  The sandwich is a good idea - I used rare earth magnets on a cadence sensor on my racing bike and it wasn't long before the road salt attacked them and they started to corrode.

Kev.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: compfranon on August 03, 2013, 12:30:02 PM
I machined both pieces of the acrylic, on the tank wall side I left a 1-2mm thick web to improve the magnetic joint.

Then I secured the two pieces together with solvent weld, making sure there was good coverage to ensure no route for water to seep in. Clamp the joint and let it set.

When I take it out from the water to give it a clean I check the magnets for any sign of corrosion.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: caddie on August 26, 2013, 03:19:34 PM
Quality build!!! really like it.

What drivers are you using.  Im struggling with decising what I need.  I think i need the same lighting as you, so if you could do a parts list that would be great.  Mainly from the connection to the arduino onwards..... sorry
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 12, 2014, 09:23:50 PM
A quick update.  Tank running well and seems settled.  Jarduino been running without a hitch for over a year.  Added some Purigen and it really does make the water crystal clear.  I also gave in and bought a second hand Vortech MP10.  Works brilliantly with a Jarduino controlled pulsing powerhead at the back of the tank.  For anyone considering splashing out I would say don't hesitate - I hummed and hawed for ages but have never regretted it.

My tank is ready for some more corals.  Check out my new quarantine tank post coming soon.  With my main tank being so settled I'm not prepared to put anything new into it without 5 or 6 weeks in quarantine first!



(http://s7.postimg.org/fxhb2ehqv/DSC01239.jpg) (http://postimg.org/image/fxhb2ehqv/)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on February 13, 2014, 04:54:02 AM
Looks fantastic.  I don't blame you for not rushing to throw new stuff into that pristine tank of yours. Can't wait to see what you have on the waiting list.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: bigguy on February 13, 2014, 08:48:50 AM
nice one looks fantastic dude :)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: smudge on February 17, 2014, 08:32:21 PM
Something to help inspire, very nice Kev
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: junirsalim on February 18, 2014, 01:59:49 AM
Great Build!

Hello, i'm new to this forum. 
I planning to make a jArduino too. Still reading a lot here....

I Want to ask, can you explain how to use LEDSEEDUINO 6 channel, connect to Arduino Mega 2560 ? And How you connect the same color of LED (like 7 Led RB x 2channel ) to be controled to jArduino ?
From what I read, Ledseeduino using  CH1 = PWM pin 2, CH2 = PWM pin 3, CH3 = PWM pin 4, etc , and jArduino using PIN 7,8,9,10,11,12,13
Can you give me example if CH1 and CH2 for LED RB which controlled using jArduino pin 10

A lot of Thanks, and sorry for my english.
Jun


Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: bigguy on February 18, 2014, 09:00:07 AM
HI Jun

and Welcome  Not got into this side yet But Sure somebody will Answer you Soon
And Your English Is OK Dude :)
Glad to have you on Board dude

Simon

Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 18, 2014, 09:05:20 AM

I Want to ask, can you explain how to use LEDSEEDUINO 6 channel, connect to Arduino Mega 2560 ? And How you connect the same color of LED (like 7 Led RB x 2channel ) to be controled to jArduino ?

I'll draw you a diagram as soon as I can but it's probably going to be Friday before I get the chance!
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: junirsalim on February 24, 2014, 01:31:24 AM
Hallo, sorry to ask your help... Waiting for diagram...
I'm stuck at ledseeduino....
Thank You Very Much...
Jun
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 24, 2014, 09:31:22 AM
Hallo, sorry to ask your help... Waiting for diagram...
I'm stuck at ledseeduino....
Thank You Very Much...
Jun

Here is a diagram for the LEDSEE LEDSEEDUINO shield.  It is fairly easy to connect.  If you want to use more than one channel for the same colour simply feed two channels form the same PWM pin.

I cut the pins off the bottom of the shield and stuck it to my case using double sided tape.  It doesn't seem to get warm and so far hasn't needed any extra cooling.
(http://s30.postimg.org/bmgj1qnr1/Seeduino_Diagram.jpg) (http://postimg.org/image/bmgj1qnr1/)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 24, 2014, 09:34:01 AM
Here is a diagram to explain the switch that confuses so many people!  Leave in position 1.
(http://s27.postimg.org/hmhlr8vq7/Arduino_LED_shield_mega.jpg) (http://postimg.org/image/hmhlr8vq7/)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: junirsalim on February 24, 2014, 01:43:34 PM
Oh.. I'm understand now. Thank You... Will start the build now..
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: bigguy on February 24, 2014, 04:20:57 PM
Thanks For Pic Dude

And you can have a few of these i take it ?

Simon
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on February 24, 2014, 09:34:12 PM
Thanks For Pic Dude

And you can have a few of these i take it ?

Simon
As far as I know you should be able to use multiple sets of these drivers.  I've split the PWM signal in two for my royal blues and whites and they work fine.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: bigguy on February 24, 2014, 10:17:11 PM
thanks dude :)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: raymon82 on December 04, 2014, 06:36:54 PM
Hi,

So I am a little bit confused with connecting my leds to the ledseeduino, ur picture of connecting explained allot untill i want to connect my psu. My psu is 13.5v / 29.6A 400w. I want to connect at least 325 leds hahah.

My main setup is psu -> resistor 1ohm -> 4 leds serie etc etc. So if I connect my psu to the ledseeduino i am entering 13.5v and 29.6a if I solder it to 1a output on the ledseeduino, do I still need to place the resistor from the ledseeduino -> resistor 1ohm -> 4 leds serie -> back to ledseeduino.

I have around 250 blue leds can i connect these all paralel to the ledseeduino like my setup is now?

Sorry I do not know allot anymore about electronics haha.

Any help would be nice.
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on December 06, 2014, 10:03:02 PM

Any help would be nice.


Raymon

Reduce the number of LEDs - with a 13.5v PSU and a ledseeduino driver you will be able to run a maximum of 3 LEDs per channel.  If you are going to put a resistor in, it goes between the driver and the LEDs not between the PSU and the driver.

For more reading see here:
http://tigerhawkt3.com/welcomemat/ledfaqs.htm (http://tigerhawkt3.com/welcomemat/ledfaqs.htm)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: raymon82 on December 08, 2014, 10:36:34 AM

Any help would be nice.


Raymon

Reduce the number of LEDs - with a 13.5v PSU and a ledseeduino driver you will be able to run a maximum of 3 LEDs per channel.  If you are going to put a resistor in, it goes between the driver and the LEDs not between the PSU and the driver.

So let me see if i understand.

From the 13,5v psu i go to the ledseeduino.

From the ledseeduino if I connect the port to output 1a, i can place 3 leds in serie. Can i place multiple paralel on one channel?

Or I dont connect the port of the ledseeduino to 1a but place a resistor between the ledseeduino and the 3 leds in serie?

For more reading see here:
http://tigerhawkt3.com/welcomemat/ledfaqs.htm (http://tigerhawkt3.com/welcomemat/ledfaqs.htm)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on May 21, 2015, 01:24:25 PM
A quick update from me.  Haven't been around the forum for a while, but am still enjoying my mini reef.  My Jarduino hasn't missed a beat.

I'm not dosing any chemicals - I have activated carbon in a sock in the rear chambers along with some Rowa Phos that I change about once every six weeks.  14 litre water changes are done religiously every fortnight; it seems that the corals I have get everything they need from the salt.

I've recently had to frag my Australian Duncan and Candy Canes.  They had become so large that they were suffocating themselves! The Candy Canes had gone from two heads to 21!!, The Duncans from three to 18!

I think there is still something to be said to keeping it small and simple.

Stick in with your building/programming everyone - it is worth it!

Kev




(http://s4.postimg.org/4i5drxywp/IMG_0598.jpg) (http://postimg.org/image/4i5drxywp/)
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on May 21, 2015, 05:01:46 PM
Wow, can't hardly see any live rock anywhere, looks like they've taken over.  I agree with you, with fairly frequent water changes (using a decent salt mixture), a lot of corals will get pretty much everything they need.  There's certainly a lot of benefits of doing water changes over dosing.  All dosing really does is replace some of the stuff corals use up in seawater, whereas water changes replaces pretty much everything, while also removing some of the toxic buildup...  In the long run wc's can be more expensive and involve more work, especially compared to an automatic dosing system.  I will eventually work on an automatic waterchanging system so one day it will level the playing field.  One day...  Anyway, thanks for the update!
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: braecottage on September 21, 2016, 09:04:18 AM
My Percula Clowns must be happy with the Jarduino lighting as they started spawning.  After a lot of reading and prep I've managed to rear some - they're six weeks old today.

Very time consuming but an interesting experience!  Sounds like the next release is getting closer Jamie....  I might need to build another tank and get the soldering iron out again for my Jarduino mk2.

Quick video here:  https://youtu.be/CwxoFNAr-1Q
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: TheDOdblG on September 21, 2016, 03:37:56 PM
Nice! Congrats on the new additions to your family :D

Yep, inching closer to finishing up the next release.  Stay tuned!
Title: Re: Kevin's Jarduino Build
Post by: Natividad on July 06, 2017, 07:18:16 AM
That's looking amazing Kev!